Praxis: Putting Theory Into Practice

OK, so I’m taking a deep breath before I write this post because I know it is going to be a long one… apologies in advance if I’ve ‘suggested’ that you read it, cos I don’t think it’s going to be a quick read, well, it will be if you skim it, and by all means, skim it! This post should have been written a week ago, when the project it is about was still fresh in my mind, but, alas, life is life and I am only getting to it now, prompted by a colleague’s request to see my program for the project… which, of course, I did not have to share.

Praxis – what is it? Well, apart from being one of my favourite words in the world (I have a Major in Philosophy, which surprises most people since I am, um, me… and I discovered the word at uni thanks to that legend, Plato) it is the name I have given to a series of week-long immersive enrichment projects that I’m running with year 7 students at my school. Basically, I love PBL, and I want an excuse to do it deeply with a bunch of super motivated kids once every term – we all have our ways to manipulate the system to get what we want, and this is mine. This post is about the first official Praxis Project that I ran in week 3 of this term. This post is (hopefully) going to outline the planning I did before the project, as well as the different stages of the project itself. For each key stage (divided by the days of the week as this was a full week project) I will identify how it meets specific PBL elements, our school’s reporting proficiencies that are essential contemporary learning skills, our school values, Quality Teaching Framework elements, Kaplan and Maker Models of curriculum development for gifted and talented learners, and which disciplines are being touched on (this project was for Maths and Science, but also touches on Geography, PDHPE, TAS, and English). Now that I’ve written all of those down, I’m realising just what a huge task I have set myself. I think I might go make myself a cup of chai before I begin…

Before project preparations…

  • Project Outline: The idea for this project came from my husband’s obsession with rope-swings. When I asked him what the project should be about, he joked that it should be about rope-swings, and then together we came up with the idea of rope-swinging into Curl Curl Lagoon. The real-world context of a project is super important, as is the authenticity of the problem that students are confronted with as this gives their learning a purpose, and thus significance. I created the project outline below (keep scrolling!) using Canva which always makes things look pretty. Note that the project outline is quite loose, and not too detailed, as it is essentially a prompt for students, providing them with the overall structure of the project, but allowing scope for their own inquiry, and creativity. I printed a colour copy of the project outline for each student, plus an A3 colour copy that I laminated for our project wall. I also added a digital copy of the project outline to our Edmodo group.
  • Experts: All projects definitely need the support of experts from outside of the school environment, but Praxis Projects especially need it as these are curriculum enrichment projects run by a single teacher (a PBL expert – me, haha) and not a ‘content’ expert. Students are thinking above and beyond any content prescribed by a syllabus for their specific age or stage. The intent is for students to engage with adults throughout the project in a way quite different to the traditional teacher-student relationship. I knew I needed an expert on the local lagoon, so I contacted the local council and was super lucky to get some great resources emailed to me AND to organise for the council’s environmental officer to speak with the students down at the lagoon (Jason Ruszczyk – such a legend). I also organised for two of my friends to be available via Edmodo to chat with students – Joseph Stephens (a science teacher and former environment officer), and Simon Borgert (HT Maths). Finally, I needed experts for the final presentation – as a panel is essential to have students respond to questions from experts – and was lucky enough to find a number who were keen to participate: Tom Davidson, a geology enthusiast, and Silvvy Choi, a STEM educator working at Sydney Uni, plus two representatives from the Curl Curl Lagoon Friends group. Finding experts is really hard, probably one of the hardest parts of PBL, but it is also one of the most important – so stick at it!
  • Participants: the Praxis Project is open to 20 year 7 students – five from each of the four core classes. I visited each class and spoke with them about the project, and handed out application forms. Students had to be passionate about and/or gifted in Maths and Science in order to apply. I also spoke at a year meeting about the project, and asked all year 7 Maths and Science teachers to identify their top five students and from this list I tapped a few kids on the shoulder and suggested they participate. In the end we have 16 students in total – many students showed interest, but did not want to miss a week worth of school, and others are keen to participate in the next Praxis Project instead.
  • Learning Space: For PBL to be effective, it really is best done in an open learning space. Our last project was run in the staff common room which is about the size of two regular classrooms, and has no furniture set up – it was awesome. This project ran during HSC Trials, so the only space I could book was a computer room. I did my best to make the room spacious by removing a couple of the big tables (there are 8 big tables in the room), and moving the remaining tables towards the back of the room, freeing up space at the front for our ‘arc’ which is essentially our meeting space (think the waterhole). Whilst the students found a way to make the space their own – one student finding it comfortable lying under the computer table – we all thought a bigger space would have been better.
  • Resources: Ensuring you have quality resources organised before the project is essential. Ensure you have a lot of stationery on hand, but these are must-haves: Post-Its, coloured markers, Sharpies, blank paper (like a paper roll from Ikea, or butchers paper), BluTak, and scissors. Project packets are folders or containers that each team can keep all of the key resources/paperwork in – yes, I am referring to paper stuff, not digital stuff cos kids do mindmaps, plans, sketches etc – I bought some cool mini cases that cost $2 each from Kmart and in them I put their project outlines, some blank paper, and handouts about the lagoon that were emailed to me by the council. I also printed off in A3 and laminated a copy of the years 3-5 BIE rubrics for collaboration, critical thinking, creativity and innovation, and presentation, one for each team. I organised with my husband’s principal to borrow 16 lab coats – one per student – and made name badges for each student e.g. ‘Dr Max, Dr Levi, Dr Xander’ etc. These small touches really transform a project into a memorable learning experience – they are the things that make a difference for me when I’m at a conference, and I know my students appreciate them too.
  • Organisation: I used Edmodo as the place for online communication, creating small groups for each team, and adding Joe and Simon in as co-teachers. I created folders with key resources and digital copies of the BIE rubrics. Students also elected to use Google Slides and Google Docs to collaborate on their presentations and planning, and I put these into a Google Drive folder that we could all access. I also discovered how easy it is to use the Google Drive app to upload photos and video from my phone to share with the kids – amazing!

Monday…

Hook Lesson (also know to some as the ‘project launch’):

The first thing students did as they entered the room was put on their lab coats, and their badges. They were VERY excited about this! I love creating a super psyched environment right from the beginning – the students are basically engaged from the start, and it challenges me to keep this type of mood for the duration of the project. Once all students were in, I asked them to sit in the ‘arc’ and then I showed them a couple of videos – the first one was of epic rope-swing fails (I edited a YouTube video for this, cutting out those that were incredibly dodgy, or that had swearing, and adding a soundtrack), and a Science of Stupid video looking at the physics of tree-climbing. The students loved watching these, and made lots of remarks about the people in the videos. After the videos I generated some discussion with the group about their experiences with rope-swinging, focusing on the locations at which they did it, what the location (including the water) looked like, how successful they were at rope-swinging and why. We had six other teachers in the room during this activity – the year 7 advisor was filming us, one DP and my principal were there, plus three teachers from Wallsend HS who were visiting to check out PBL in action.IMG_6852IMG_6854

QTF: Connectedness. Narrative. PBL essentials: Challenging Problem or Question Kaplan: Present content that is related to broad-based issues, themes, or problems. Focus on open-ended tasks. Maker: It should focus on concepts that are important to several academic areas, with the goal of integrating rather than separating what is learned.

Project Introduction:

After we watched the videos and had a chat about rope-swinging, I handed out a copy of the project outline and read it out loud to the students. This generated further discussion, but I resisted answering any questions students had, even basic ones about the project, answering them with ‘That is an excellent question, I wonder what the answer might be’. This is an essential step, because PBL is all about students asking questions, and then using resources at their disposal to answer them. Following this initial introduction to the project, I had students go off to the tables (prepped with required resources), to write things they already KNOW that will help them with the project (content knowledge, skills, and basic information about the project) on blue Post-Its, and things they WANT or NEED to know about the project in order to be successful – and these were expected to be in the form of questions – (content knowledge, skills, and basic information about the project) on pink Post-Its. They were challenged to write as many as they could in 15 minutes, and then add their Post-Its to a poster on the wall that had the headings ‘Want to Know’ and ‘What I Know’, with columns for skills, content, and project information. This process is required for all projects, as it forces students to think critically about their prior knowledge and skills, as well as generating a whole range of questions to help them launch their inquiry. Once the students had written as much as they could, they were invited back to the ‘arc’ to discuss what they came up with. I had immediately identified two very outgoing students in the group of 16, and selected them as the two ‘presenters’ who would read through all of the know and need to know Post-Its to the group – this activity allowed them to identify where students were thinking similarly and differently, and to critically evaluate the quality of their questions. During this process, I typed up (on a Word doc projected to the group) all of the ‘need to know’ questions that the group agreed on as being serious and necessary to the project’s success. By the end of this process we had well over 20 different questions that the students felt they needed answers to – pretty neat! We chatted in an informal way about how they could find out the answers, but I wished that I had done this in a more formal way, as I think it would have helped scaffold/structure their inquiry a bit better – this would be the H (how) in the KWHL table. With a focus on this very long list of questions, I asked the group to identify which questions they felt might be answered by a site assessment of Curl Curl Lagoon, and I highlighted in green all of the questions they selected – these would guide them when we visited the lagoon later in the day.

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Following this I had students select the teams they would like to work in, with the suggestion that 4 would be the perfect number. We ended up with two groups of 4, one of 5 and one of 2. Maybe we only had 15 kids participate? I don’t know, haha. Anyway, typically with curriculum-aligned PBL (that is projects run with your actual classes) I suggest that the teacher always picks the groups, but as this is a one week only intensive project with a group of young people I do not know, I allowed the students to select amongst themselves.

Finally, we spent about 10 minutes as a group creating a project calendar that was an overview of the week, identifying what needed to be done each day in order to successfully complete the project – this was just written in text on a piece of paper, and it was noted that each team may end up at different stages depending on where their ideas take them.

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QTF: Connectedness, Engagement, Narrative. PBL essentials: Challenging Problem or Question Kaplan: Present content that is related to broad-based issues, themes, or problems. Focus on open-ended tasks. Maker: It should focus on concepts that are important to several academic areas, with the goal of integrating rather than separating what is learned. Proficiencies: Demonstrates strong organisational and time-management skills.

Discover:

The group was now ready to really get into the ‘discover’ stage of the project – which meant our site assessment of Curl Curl Lagoon. The first thing I had them do was identify what roles each team-member would be responsible for when down at the lagoon, as I didn’t want them just rambling around directionless. We identified four key roles and responsibilities: water-testing, catching specimens of marine life, taking photos/mapping the lagoon, and identifying suitable trees or locations for the rope-swing. Each team decided on who would be responsible for each role, and then I created a list so I could hand out resources (water testing kit, nets, camera, etc) to the appropriate students.

We walked down to the lagoon, which is only about 5 minutes from school, and met Jason Ruszczyk and one of his colleagues, who then took us down to the lagoon (well, a part of Greendale Creek actually) to discuss its current health, and some of the factors contributing to it. The lagoon is VERY unclean – and this was immediately noted by the students when they saw it. Jason was exceptionally knowledgeable, and shared his expertise with this group, allowing them to see how he uses technical equipment to assess the water quality. I was super impressed by his vocabulary – so many scientific words I didn’t know the meaning of but was very keen to learn. I think he was quite amused by the students’ driving question, and felt pretty confident that rope-swinging into the lagoon isn’t something anyone would want to do any time soon. The students asked thoughtful questions, and discovered that the health of a catchment is very complex in an urbanised and industrialised area. After Jason left, we continued to walk around the lagoon, testing the water quality ourselves at a range of places and recording the data, as well as taking a lot of photographs, and considering the suitability of the trees for rope-swings. Students also tried to catch specimens of marine life, but failed as the water is so deoxygenated that virtually nothing can live there. This was a really fun part of our project, and many of the students commented that they would have liked to return to the lagoon later in the week to think more critically about it – I know one team actually did meet there in the morning before school!

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On return to school we looked through a resource on the science of catchments (I learnt the words eutrophication and benthos) and the history of Curl Curl Lagoon that Jason shared with me via email, as well as excerpts of a long document on site inspections relating to water quality for recreational swimming. These resources were shared via Edmodo, and supplemented by students’ own research into catchments, and water quality. As students did their independent research, I added all the new words we learnt to our ‘word wall’ – this is a way of helping students track what they know, or should know, to be successful with the project. That ended the first day of Praxis! Phew! (Only four more to write about, haha – I can DO this!)

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QTF: Deep knowledge, Deep understanding, Higher-order thinking, Metalanguage, Explicit quality criteria, Engagement, High expectations, Social support, Students’ self-regulation, Background knowledge, Knowledge Integration, Connectedness Proficiencies: Demonstrates critical thinking about information, ideas and problems PBL Essentials: Authenticity, Sustained Inquiry, Key Knowledge and Understanding Kaplan: Integrate multiple disciplines into the area of study. Develop productive, complex, abstract, and/or higher level thinking skills. Develop research skills and methods. Maker: It should include process skills such as higher levels of thinking and problem-solving as a separate scope and sequence that is integrated with the development of content understanding. It must include input from scholars and researchers in academic areas regarding the importance of principles, concepts, skills, and values.

Tuesday…

Discover:

Students began the day in the ‘arc’ where I introduced them to the BIE rubric on ‘critical thinking’. The BIE have a range of rubrics that are free to download, and I have used all of them – from the K-2 rubrics, right up to the 6-12 rubrics. For year 7 I quite like the grades 3-5 rubrics, as they are thoughtfully categorised but not too dense on detail that they lose meaning. The 6-12 rubrics can be very difficult for students to use effectively for the first time. I spoke with students about the different categories (which nicely reflect the discover, create and share stages of a project), and the different aspects of each level – below standard, approaching standard, and at standard. I used examples from what I saw students do the day before, and pointed out aspects I would like to see them address that day. Given more time, I would have made students use the rubric to self or peer assess their current critical thinking, but as it was we just used it as a tool to focus their understanding of what it means to think critically during PBL.

Students were then directed to work in their teams to brainstorm everything they learnt the day before, using textas on a blank piece of paper. Teams then selected a person to share  with the group the five most important things from their brainstorming – this led to a great discussion/reflection on the previous day, and helped clarify some ideas for different students.

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The focus for Tuesday was to apply their new understanding of the science of catchments to the project, developing a proposed solution for the water quality issues at Curl Curl Lagoon. To help with this, I had them return to the document on assessing a site for recreational swimming, drawing their attention to a table that identified all of the aspects to be considered (PH levels, aesthetic quality, physical hazards, bacteria levels etc), and set the challenge for them to identify the ideal conditions for recreational swimming, the real current conditions at Curl Curl Lagoon, and their suggested solutions. This information was to be presented that afternoon to a panel consisting of myself, the principal, a PE teacher, and a prac teacher. This was essentially a formative assessment – it allowed me to see what students knew about the science of catchments, and their presentations skills. In the three hours leading up to the presentations, I saw students being very creative in their approach to research, with one team approaching a visiting rep from the CSIRO for his ideas, and seeking assistance from a science teacher. The presentations were held near the end of the day, and as I watched them I wrote down ‘medals’ and ‘missions’ for each team, which I then spoke with them about afterwards to help refine their presentation style, and the content of their presentations.

QTF: Deep knowledge, Deep understanding, Higher-order thinking, Metalanguage, Explicit quality criteria, Engagement, High expectations, Social support, Students’ self-regulation, Background knowledge, Knowledge Integration, Connectedness Proficiencies: Demonstrates critical thinking about information, ideas and problems PBL Essentials: Authenticity, Sustained Inquiry, Key Knowledge and Understanding Kaplan: Integrate multiple disciplines into the area of study. Develop productive, complex, abstract, and/or higher level thinking skills. Develop research skills and methods. Maker: It should include process skills such as higher levels of thinking and problem-solving as a separate scope and sequence that is integrated with the development of content understanding. It must include input from scholars and researchers in academic areas regarding the importance of principles, concepts, skills, and values.

Wednesday…

Discover:

Once again the day began in the ‘arc’ – this time we rewatched the Science of Stupid video on tree climbing, as well as three other videos – one on the physics of swings, and two on the physics of rope swings. I had found these videos the day before, as well as a range of other resources that I shared with the group via Edmodo. I’ll just remind you all that I am an English teacher, not a Physics teacher, and at no point did the students see me as an expert in Maths or Science. My job was to create the context for which they would need to discover and apply a range of scientific and mathematical skills and content. Many of these kids genuinely understood the ideas explored in these videos, but some needed it explained to them by their peers. The focus for this day of the project was to get students thinking about the maths and science of rope-swinging, and I knew that some would take this further than others, just like some had immersed themselves in the science of catchments more than others – that’s the whole purpose of a curriculum enrichment project, to allow students to push in the direction that most fascinates them. In saying that, I do think that this part of the project would have been enhanced had I organised for a physics teacher/expert to come and speak to the students in person about the problems relating to rope-swinging – and the students themselves identified this as a small weakness in the project also. I blame my disorganisation, plus also my genuine fear that if I invited in a teacher they might think that they needed to run a two hour teacher-centred lecture (so lots of prep), or that they might have talked down to the students, or argued that year 7 students aren’t able to deal with this level of maths/physics… so yeah, teacher fail from me.

QTF: Deep knowledge, Deep understanding, Higher-order thinking, Metalanguage, Explicit quality criteria, Engagement, High expectations, Social support, Students’ self-regulation, Background knowledge, Knowledge Integration, Connectedness Proficiencies: Demonstrates critical thinking about information, ideas and problems PBL Essentials: Authenticity, Sustained Inquiry, Key Knowledge and Understanding Kaplan: Integrate multiple disciplines into the area of study. Develop productive, complex, abstract, and/or higher level thinking skills. Develop research skills and methods. Maker: It should include process skills such as higher levels of thinking and problem-solving as a separate scope and sequence that is integrated with the development of content understanding. It must include input from scholars and researchers in academic areas regarding the importance of principles, concepts, skills, and values. It must not restrict the students’ opportunities to purse accelerated content, processes, or products.

Create:

Hmmm… at some stage we identified all of the problems associated with the rope-swing that needed solving (weight of swinger, height of swing, length of rope, depth of water etc), and then they got to work in their groups on their preliminary rope-swing designs, calculating the maths of their designs, and researching the physics they needed to know.  We had one team outside throwing ropes out of a second story window and measuring the angle at which is would swing, with the assistance of a PE teacher, another group was creating a prototype out of clay, whilst another was coding the rope-swing physics in Python (no kidding, this kid is amazing), and another drawing, and then designing in Sketch-up. This was all a bit messy, but I think that’s OK cos students need time to just try to work things out themselves. During the last period of the day they spent time with one of our DPs, who is a Maths teacher, whilst I was on class, and I am assuming that during this time some of their calculations were checked etc.

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QTF: Problematic knowledge, Explicit quality criteria, Engagement, High expectations, Social support, Student direction, Knowledge Integration Proficiencies: Applies creative and innovative thinking to learning. Monitors own learning, and applies feedback to achieve personal best. PBL Essentials: Public Product, Critique & Revision, Student Voice & Choice Kaplan: Encourages the development of products that challenge existing ideas and produce ‘new’ ideas. Encourage the development of products that use new techniques, materials, and forms. Maker: It should include process skills such as higher levels of thinking and problem-solving as a separate scope and sequence that is integrated with the development of content understanding. It should include an emphasis on development of types of sophisticated products integrated with the content and process.

(Preliminary) Share:

Wednesday is sport day at our school, but it was cancelled due to wet weather, so students chose to stay in Praxis and keep working on their project – I thought that was pretty cool! During this time they continued with their research, and preliminary designs, and I created a list of all the things they needed to include in their final presentations on Friday (I posted this to our project wall), and informally pointed these out to different students, who shared this with their peers.

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QTF: Narrative, Student direction, Social support, High expectations, Explicit quality criteria, Substantive communication Proficiencies: Monitors own learning, and applies feedback to achieve personal best PBL Essentials: Public Product, Reflection, Authenticity Kaplan: Encourages the development of self-understanding, i.e. recognising and using one’s abilities, becoming self-directed, appreciating likenesses and differences between oneself and others. Evaluate student outcomes by using appropriate and specific criteria through self-appraisal, criterion references and/or standardised instruments. Maker: It should focus on concepts that are important to several academic areas, with the goal of integrating rather than separating what is learned.

Thursday…

Create:

Beginning in the ‘arc’ again, the day’s focus was on ‘creativity and innovation’ and ‘presentation’ skills – as with Tuesday’s morning session, we read through the BIE rubric, and discussed the different aspects, and informally assessing each team’s progress through this discussion. I spoke specifically about the different types of presentations – informative, imaginative, and persuasive, and gave examples from the Jason’s presentation at the previous night’s Curl Curl Lagoon Friends meeting that I attended, along with a couple of the Praxis students. Students appreciated that a great presentations is informative, imaginative, AND persuasive, and this was reflected in their final presentations the next day.

I then had each team brainstorm the ‘maths and science of rope-swinging’, and once again had them share the top five things they need to know. This was really helpful for a couple of the groups who needed some extra information about this, as they could identify the teams from whom they could learn the most, and planned to spend time with them later in the day. I created a big list of all of the key terms students might need to know, and put this list on the project wall for students to see. I was VERY impressed with what they discovered, and really enjoyed being taught about it from a few very enthusiastic students!

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QTF: Problematic knowledge, Explicit quality criteria, Engagement, High expectations, Social support, Student direction, Knowledge Integration Proficiencies: Applies creative and innovative thinking to learning. Monitors own learning, and applies feedback to achieve personal best. PBL Essentials: Public Product, Critique & Revision, Student Voice & Choice Kaplan: Encourages the development of products that challenge existing ideas and produce ‘new’ ideas. Encourage the development of products that use new techniques, materials, and forms. Maker: It should include process skills such as higher levels of thinking and problem-solving as a separate scope and sequence that is integrated with the development of content understanding. It should include an emphasis on development of types of sophisticated products integrated with the content and process.

Share:

Students spent the rest of the day working on their rope-swing models and presentations. All teams chose to use Google Slides for their presentations as they could easily collaborate on the slideshow in real time. One team had taken it upon themselves to get help from the TAS faculty, with the HT of TAS generously giving up his time to help them build a scale model of their design – this was a group of four girls, and seeing their beaming smiles as they returned with their finished product made me hopeful that they will pursue TAS subjects when they get to choose electives in the later years of schooling.

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One student helped me to design invitations for parents, teachers, and selected year 7 students to attend the Praxis presentations the next day, and he also created a thank-you card to be given to teachers who helped them during the week, and the panelists attending the presentations.

QTF: Narrative, Student direction, Social support, High expectations, Explicit quality criteria, Substantive communication Proficiencies: Monitors own learning, and applies feedback to achieve personal best PBL Essentials: Public Product, Reflection, Authenticity Kaplan: Encourages the development of self-understanding, i.e. recognising and using one’s abilities, becoming self-directed, appreciating likenesses and differences between oneself and others. Evaluate student outcomes by using appropriate and specific criteria through self-appraisal, criterion references and/or standardised instruments. Maker: It should focus on concepts that are important to several academic areas, with the goal of integrating rather than separating what is learned.

Friday…

Share:

Students spent the morning session putting the final touches on their presentations, and their visual representations of their rope-swing. We then headed off to the presentation space (our school library) to get it set up – furniture was arranged including seating for guests, and a table for the panelists. The panelists each got four copies of the audience feedback sheet provided online for free by the BIE, and I made sure that there were stickers and some small toys for one panelist’s young daughter who would be attending also. I ensured the students negotiated resources with the librarian, and that they were responsible for the setting up, not me. Students set up their food on a table for refreshments, which was a nice touch also. Each student also signed the thank-you cards, to be given with a box of chocolates to the people who supported them in their learning during the week.

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Ideally each team would have run through their presentation, but there simply wasn’t time so all I could do was cross my fingers and hope for awesome… and boy were they awesome! It was so inspiring to see these young learners stand up there in front of a pretty tough panel, and pitch their designs and solutions as a team. Each presentation went for approximately 10 minutes, and all teams had to respond to questions from the panel at the end – and let me tell you, this panel wasn’t asking easy questions, especially relating to the practicalities of their proposed solutions, and the science/maths of their designs. I was scared for them, but they all responded confidently, and with good humour! I loved that their presentations were all original, and that they had considered how to be informative, and persuasive, as well as engaging. At the end, students joined their invited guests for light refreshments… a super successful event!

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QTF: Narrative, Student direction, Social support, High expectations, Explicit quality criteria, Substantive communication Proficiencies: Monitors own learning, and applies feedback to achieve personal best PBL Essentials: Public Product, Reflection, Authenticity Kaplan: Encourages the development of self-understanding, i.e. recognising and using one’s abilities, becoming self-directed, appreciating likenesses and differences between oneself and others. Evaluate student outcomes by using appropriate and specific criteria through self-appraisal, criterion references and/or standardised instruments. Maker: It should focus on concepts that are important to several academic areas, with the goal of integrating rather than separating what is learned.

Reflect:

Whilst it’s easy to think that once the presentations are done, that a project is over – but it’s not. It is SO important that you give students time to reflect on their learning, and on the project itself. After lunch, we re-grouped in Room 127 – a space that had become a second home for us all – and I had them complete the BIE project reflection sheet. This helped them think about their learning, what they enjoyed, what they found hard, what they would have liked to have done differently, as well as make critical comments about how they would have liked the project itself to be different. This can be hard for some teachers to read, but it is what we need to know in order to refine our practice. Students were also given an opportunity to read through the comments from the panelists regarding their presentations, and this produced some lively conversations within each team as they argued out whether they were correct or incorrect points being made, haha.

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The last thing we did as a team, not sitting in the arc, but sitting haphazardly around the room, was to go back through the 20 or so ‘need to know’ questions that they had generated during our first morning together… it was fun to hear them shouting out their answers, and knowing that they HAD actually found out the answers to the questions. As we packed up the room, a couple of students tried their best to keep their lab coats on forever, and many asked to take home small mementoes of Praxis – their name badges, posters from the wall, etc… that was pretty cool. Oh, and somewhere in there they wrote and sang me a thank you song… yeah, that was pretty cool too.

Proficiencies: Monitors own learning, and applies feedback to achieve personal best PBL Essentials: Reflection Kaplan: Encourages the development of self-understanding, i.e. recognising and using one’s abilities, becoming self-directed, appreciating likenesses and differences between oneself and others.

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8 thoughts on “Praxis: Putting Theory Into Practice

  1. Thank you for taking the time to write this up, it is such an important record. I really appreciate the detail – watching this unfold on social media I had so many questions! Hoped you would blog about it all and this did not disappoint.

    What other praxis projects are on the horizon?

  2. Pingback: Praxis: Designing Games for Good | Bianca Hewes

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